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got a package today and it doesn't have ANY franking on. it does have a 90p stamp on, but nothing else, no ink that i can see at all.

so could their be hidden markings on it? or am i good to reuse this stamp?
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You used to be able to get away with it even though you shouldn't. Nowadays, Stamps usually have small cut-outs that don't come off when you remove the stamp, so leaving the stamp with a hole signifying it has been restuck and re used.
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i was thinking of just using the jiffy bag again and changing the address. so the stamp would remain in the proper place.
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In answer to your question, the Express article that Martin linked to says "It is illegal to re-use a stamp in the UK.".

However, the question arises, in your case: have the stamps been used, if they are not franked? One could, for instance, imagine a case where someone stamps a letter and then delivers it by hand. If this were the case, you wouldn't be re-using them.

LoroDue
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I would re-use the envelope if they can't be bothered to frank the stamp!

Mike
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got a package today and it doesn't have ANY franking on. it does have a 90p stamp on, but nothing else, no ink that i can see at all.

so could their be hidden markings on it? or am i good to reuse this stamp?


In effect a stamp is a receipt to prove you have paid for 90p worth of postage in advance. Once that postage has been used, the stamp is usually franked to minimise fraud by preventing reuse.

The fact it hasn't been franked doesn't alter the basic facts: YOU haven't paid the 90p and so haven't bought the right to 90p's worth of postage. If you re-use the stamp, you are pretending you HAVE paid the money, and you will be misrepresenting the facts, and effectively perpretrating a fraud.

It isn't the question of franked / unfranked that makes the difference, it is a question of whether the payer has received the postal services that they paid for or not. In your case, the original sender has received the 90p of postage they paid for, and the stamp is now no longer valid for further use.

If, however, the question is "Can I get a way with reusing a stamp fraudulently" the answer is almost certainly "Yes"
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If, however, the question is "Can I get a way with reusing a stamp fraudulently" the answer is almost certainly "Yes"

This is DAK. Asked. Answered. Job done.

:-)

Scott.
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This post should NOT be "closed"

Whilst the stamp may be unfranked the envelope has almost certainly got phosporescent dots on it as a legacy of its journey through the postal system.

Trying to decipher someones handwriting into a recognizeable postcode is the most technologically "difficult" part of the postal system.

When letters and parcels enter the postal system they are scanned by machines and a series of machine-readable phosphor dots are placed onto the envelope to make it easy to machine-read from then on.

If I was writing the code then any "reused" envelope would be referred to a manual operator to verify that the stamp isn't being used in exactly the way the OP wants.

Given the efficiencies of the Post Office I think that it is possible that the attempted fraud may well slip through the net - that said I think that "almost certainly" is too definitive a statement.

Regards

Pheid
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As an aside, I read the Daily Express link, and came across this bit:-


"Organised criminals advertise job-lots of used stamps on internet sites at knock down prices, selling them as brand new."


I'm constantly amazed at the stupidity of journalists (actually, I'm not amazed). But when they write such garbage as that, one questions the validity of everything else in the article.

One tries very hard to imagine organised fraudulent stamp sydicates with modern day Fagins quietly steaming off stamps and presumably funding terrorism....

I reckon that only one letter/parcel in 50 these days that comes through my door with an actual stamp on it. The rest have franking stickers.
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One tries very hard to imagine organised fraudulent stamp sydicates with modern day Fagins quietly steaming off stamps and presumably funding terrorism....

Not quite. But there is some truth in it.

There is a market for 'kiloware' where dealers (some of whom may be criminal, some not) sell job lots of 'used' stamps by weight. They are still stuck on paper - it's the buyer that sorts through, finds the unused ones, and reuses them. The advertising sort of suggests you do that.

That's generally where your 'collect stamps for charity' offerings land up.
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When letters and parcels enter the postal system they are scanned by machines and a series of machine-readable phosphor dots are placed onto the envelope to make it easy to machine-read from then on.

That's an interesting point. I frequently re-use Jiffy bags, for example, sticking a new label over the old address, and another over the old stamp before attaching a new stamp. But presumably the phosphor dots from the original posting are still there ... is that then likely to cause a delay ?
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I frequently re-use Jiffy bags, for example, sticking a new label over the old address, and another over the old stamp before attaching a new stamp. But presumably the phosphor dots from the original posting are still there ... is that then likely to cause a delay ?

I reuse them all the time, and have never knowingly had any delays (Lots of times I've used them for sending things I've sold on eBay, and I know they arrived quickly).

Alan
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